Friday, June 03, 2011

Private security mimicking cops promotes confusion


Should average citizens be able to tell the difference between private security and law enforcement, or should private security firms be allowed to openly mimic law enforcement in ways that may confuse the public? A reader forwards an email complaining about a Texas security firm called "Statewide Patrol" whose cars and uniforms intentionally mimic professional law enforcement, as evidenced by the vehicles above. The company's website pitches their services as a substitute for real cops, announcing that "Public law enforcement coverage is being spread thinner and thinner. Texas communities have become aware and alarmed by the situation. With greater frequency Statewide Patrol is being asked to fill some of the voids left by the depleting ranks of Law Enforcement." Further, according to their site, while:
In theory the goal of Law Enforcement agencies is to prevent and reduce crime, in practice most of their resources are depleted in response to rather than the prevention of crime. Statewide Patrol on the other hand is primarily concerned with maintaining order, apprehending criminals and enforcing laws within a constitutionally and statutorily mandated criminal justice system.

Statewide Patrol’s standing guards project authority, professionalism, and confidence. The look of our uniform closely resembles those of law enforcement; including a metal badge, brass nametag, shoulder patches, and appropriate rank.

 Statewide Patrol requires all of our officers to wear a full duty belt including: handcuffs, flashlight, and communications. Qualified officers may also carry a firearm, O.C. (Pepper) spray, and/or an expandable baton. Statewide Patrol is proud to provide the look and quality of professional security services.

Our unique combination of professional capabilities; experience, training, knowledge, and management, allow Statewide Patrol, Inc. to provide exemplary professional security services for your protection needs, and your need for peace of mind.
Why would it be important that "The look of our uniform closely resembles those of law enforcement" if the company's aim wasn't to foster confusion among those who encounter their employees? Police have certain powers and command a certain deference from the public that does not apply to private security, but these fellows are all but impersonating police officers. I'm sure they don't clarify the distinction when they're " apprehending criminals and enforcing laws," as stated on their website. The person who forwarded me the link declared "This particular company is creepy to me b/c they are trying HARD to look like state troopers. DPS doesn't give a hoot--they've got them listed as a sanctioned 'private security bureau' on their website."

In addition to seeming to mislead the public about the status of their employees, the company also has some misleading statements in press releases on their site, one of which breathlessly warns of the "continued rise in crime in the country," despite crime overall declining in Texas for more than a decade. Further, many of their employees listed on the DPS website (e.g., here, here, here, here, here, and here) have expired security officer licenses. (Perhaps DPS simply isn't keeping their website up to date, but the majority of Statewide Patrol employees I sampled this morning were listed as having expired licenses.)

Impersonating a police officer is supposed to be a crime, not a business model. There's certainly a role for private security, but they shouldn't cross the line and begin impersonating cops. While I'm sure some of their employees are licensed officers moonlighting as private security, average citizens won't know if they're dealing with an actual law-enforcement officer or just a wannabe, and that's clearly intentional. These guys are no more patrol officers than Junior Brown:


MORE: A commenter points out that the company claims the authority to "Apprehend and arrest suspects for crimes against you or your property," though of course private security do not have "arrest" powers. What hubris! Further, a sign  they provide "free" to customers declares that, "All vehicles and persons on this property are subject to being stopped and questioned," and that "All persons on this property are subject to search as this is private property." (Emphasis in original.) I'm not sure that's true, anymore than I have the right to stop, question or search anyone who walks across my yard if there's no reason to believe they've committed a crime. (Their client list includes apartment complexes and homeowners associations, so if true, such authority would presumably include visitors going to and from private residences.) Between intentionally mimicking police dress and claiming unwarranted "arrest" and "search" authority, this company really does seem to be pushing the limits of propriety and legality.

50 comments:

Anonymous said...

OOOOOHHH MY MY MY! Nothing good will come of this!

James said...

Funny, they're starting to crack down on the security company the college uses down here for doing this very same thing. Maybe because they don't actually send their employees to the mandated training and have them running around campus conducting illegal searches and seizures.

Sandy said...

Sure looks like impersonating an officer of the law to me. Ugly and dangerous.

But THANKS for Junior Brown!

Anonymous said...

The cops are as much at fault as are the private companies. Between wearing a hodgepodge of clothing for uniforms and allowing any varieity of paint jobs on their cars - including white-on-white decals to conceal traffic enforcement units - why just blame the businesses?

Easier to regulate the police uniforms and markings. In Florida, for example, deputies of whatever department generally used to wear a uniforn of green with minor individual differences in it. Patches are also similar. Hell, in just Harris County we have dozens of different uniforms and paint schemes. Constables alone total 8 different outfits. Throw in different uniforms for dress, field, rough duty, SWAT, flight dept., etc. and in gets really crazy. With the current variety allowed no matter what someone wears they probably look like some local copper. :~)

ckikerintulia said...

A situation ripe for abuse and possible tragedy. If one of these guys flashes his blue light at me do I have to stop? Can he beat me up (or worse)for resisting arrest?

Phelps said...

The only quibble I have is that the powers the police enjoy are simple extensions of the rights every citizen has, and they shouldn't enjoy any particular deference from the public.

Then again, I want my private security to be a unlike the cops as possible. All the things that they list here are the things I don't like about modern policing.

Phelps said...

If one of these guys flashes his blue light at me do I have to stop?

Actually, if they have a car with blue lights, they are in violation of 547.305

DarthVelma said...

I guess the question to ask, even before "Am I free to go?" is now "Are you an actual police officer or just a rent-a-cop?"

Gritsforbreakfast said...

Phelps, actually cops have qualified immunity for lots of stuff average citizens would be personally liable for, and officers have other specific powers and protections that average citizes don't. E.g., I can't be arrested simply for lying to you but can if I make a false allegation to a cop, etc..

Phelps said...

I understand qualified immunity and false statements, but at its core, police work is nothing more than what you or I could do (citizens arrest, self-defense, etc), just with much more risk of liability.

Twilight said...

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Anonymous said...

yeppers, big problems gonna happen. their site references them as making arrests. no security guard can arrest anyone, they can detain, huge difference. their sign also says that they can stop anyone and question and/or search anyone. this is also false (with the exception of someone observed to be commiting a crime), although it may be private property, with the exception of someone entering into a residence or a place that is otherwise closed to the general public this can't be done.

Anonymous said...

Seems to me this is just another little novelty in the evolution of private security in this country. Private security firms have been operating in this country, with varying degrees of legal authority, dating at least back to the mid-19th century. Security firms such as Pinkerton, Brink, Burn and Wackenhut were integrally involved in the evolution of the rail and banking systems in this country. Quirkier still is the continued existence of the "Special Rangers" or brand inspectors for the Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association. They are certified peace officers commissioned by the DPS but working for a private entity and with full peace officer authority as it relates to offenses involving livestock.

rodsmith said...

this is why i use the how you act method. You act professional and polite i treat you that way. come on like a wanna be nazi stormtrooper and i'm just gonna take you out no matter WHAT costume your wearing

as for immunity qualified or otherwise.. i dont' belive in it for my employees! and last time i looked WE created the govt and put the people in place to run it. I.E. employees!

as for the little blue lights anyone dumb enough to try and block me passage on a public road is just BEGGING to get hurt!

Anonymous said...

OMG! When our soldiers across sees had strict engagement rules we hired civilian contractors to do the dirty deeds.

Maybe DPS intends to use privatized law enforcement in a similar fashion.

Absosutely amazing that citizens can't mobilize private force to defend the border but we can have private "security"/policing to use against citizens of the US. That's some serious B.S.

Old Cop said...

Ono or two good $$$ jillion dollar lawsuits against the idiots running this outfit will break 'em from sucking eggs. This is all Texas needs is more fools playing "cops". Some of the real ones are bad enough. C'mon corporate business model planners, this is NOT a good idea.

Anonymous said...

Responding to Anonymous at 11:10AM, the Special Rangers with the Cattle Raisers Association do not have full police powers, although their investigators must be licensed by TCLEOSE as peace officers and they have prior law enforcement experience, the Special Ranger commission they have through DPS limits their arrest powers and they can only enforce specific offenses related to the protection of life and property.

Scott In South Austin said...

Excellent post Grits. I saw these yahoos in Arlington last week and had to do a double head turn to make sure they were not law enforcement. I asked myself the same questions you posed in this posting.

Thanks for including Junior Brown.

MailDeadDrop said...

re: "All persons on this property are subject to search as this is private property."
By posting this sign, they've made "consent to search" a part of the agreement for being on the property. So they then *do* have the right to search, as anyone on the property has consented to search.

re: "I'm not sure that's true, anymore than I have the right to stop, question or search anyone who walks across my yard if there's no reason to believe they've committed a crime."
Being on private property without consent *is* a crime -- trespass. There may be technical requirements to make the charge stick (i.e. post signs, close gates, etc.).

Phelps said...

re: "All persons on this property are subject to search as this is private property."
By posting this sign, they've made "consent to search" a part of the agreement for being on the property. So they then *do* have the right to search, as anyone on the property has consented to search.

re: "I'm not sure that's true, anymore than I have the right to stop, question or search anyone who walks across my yard if there's no reason to believe they've committed a crime."


Not really. It's no more in effect than "owner reserves the right to kill anyone at any time." You can tell them to leave if they don't let you search, but you don't have a right to a search.

Being on private property without consent *is* a crime -- trespass. There may be technical requirements to make the charge stick (i.e. post signs, close gates, etc.).

Nope. It's not a crime until the notice is given, and that sign above is not enough notice.

These guys are really playing with fire. I sure wouldn't want to be their insurance carrier.

Anonymous said...

Can't anyone (ie a citizen) arrest another person for a felony or breach of the peace? Grits and his readers have the power to arrest, right? Yes.

And false analogy on murder vs search upon entry to property. Murder is illegal act, search isn't. You can't consent to an illegal act. Go to a concert or to Sea World- your items and your body can be searched as condition of entry.

Doesn't 4th Amendment only apply to law enforcement?

Phelps said...

Doesn't 4th Amendment only apply to law enforcement?

I don't see anything in the constitution about the right to be secure being limited to the government, like say freedom of speech ("Congress shall make no laws").

And no, you don't have a right to search other people. Start sticking your hands in other people's pockets on the street, and see where you end up first -- the jail or the hospital.

Gritsforbreakfast said...

7:07 - The Fourth Amendment applies to law enforcement, saying they can only search with a warrant (or according to activist judges, under "exigent" circumstances without one). But private citizens can't get warrants and have no right to search at all. Doing so would be a tort, and if you searched somebody and took something from them, conceivably even theft.

Christine said...

If it looks like a cop, walks like a cop, carries weapons like a cop, has the same powers as a cop, then it's a cop. They shouldn't be allowed.

Anonymous said...

On a different note, what if there's something going down and a citizen waves down one of these guys thinking he's a legit officer? What is he going to do? I can see how this might create the false impression of "security" in a situation where a real cop is needed.

Anonymous said...

7:07 here. Rent-a-pigs generally strike me as wanna be cops. Impersonation would be if they had badges or uniforms that literally stated "police". I imagine that isnt the case here, so that's a poorly conceived allegation. Are they actually pulling people over and arresting them beyond the confines of their client's premises? I can hire one of these mental deficients to secure my home. Yes they can search you if you decide to come onto my property and yes they can arrest you decide to steal from me. However, a person always has the option of not entering my private property.

Anonymous said...

I worked for one of these companies, for a while. I didn't do security work, but they did. They advertise it all the time about the decrease of cops, and they have the cars... they think they are bada$$e$ and I would laugh at them. Basically, they couldn't qualify as cops for one reason or another... but as far as many of them being outdated on the DPS site... they don't accept terminations or quits, anymore, so the company doesn't keep up with someones license, and this industry has lots of turnover... $8-15 an hour job, depending on where you are. I know San Antonio is $8-10. There are lots of websites too, for security firms and they don't have individual license, they are operating as a branch of another company, but under a different name in a different city.... They collect licenses.. it's an odd crowd... they do PI, Security, Alarm Installer, Locksmith, Security Teaching... they just collect all the licenses... please look into a firm before you hire them, and go visit their office, it may just be a doublewide with chickens running around... there are a lot of illegitimate people in this field, I was amazed when I got in, and still amazed.

Anonymous said...

Wait until CCA, GEO and the rest catch on that there's a buck to make here. Registered Sex Offenders enforcing the law and making arrests, coming to a neighborhood near you!

PacoVilla said...

Unqualified wanna-be's have been working as private prison guards for decades. It is just as outrageous to permit CCA or GEO to supervise the restriction of inmates' Constitutional rights as it is to permit a private force police powers. Trouble is, nobody cares until it affects them. Alas, what's good for the goose...

-Jeff Doyle
PacoVilla Corrections blog

Anonymous said...

The appearance is definitely an issue. It needs to be addressed and in fact there was legislation introduced but failed this year that would have made it a bit clearer with respect to vehicles.

There are a couple of things wrong with this blog and I am note taking side, but if you are going to write it, you should be sure of what you are writing. I know a few posts have tried to explain some of this but I will try to consolidate it.

1. The examples you gave of expired employees is bad, all companies listed with DPS have employees listed who are expired and most likely they are not employees anymore so to make the claim is not accurate unless you have information that all those people are still employed with the company. DPS does not remove employees from the list of any complany.

2. A security guard does have arrest authority, just as much as any private citizen does. Here is the code - CHAPTER 14. ARREST WITHOUT WARRANT Art. 14.01. OFFENSE WITHIN VIEW. (a) A peace officer or any other person, may, without a warrant, arrest an offender when the offense is committed in his presence or within his view, if the offense is one classed as a felony or as an offense against the public peace. Here is the link - http://www.statutes.legis.state.tx.us/DocViewer.aspx?K2DocKey=odbc%3a%2f%2fTCAS%2fASUPUBLIC.dbo.vwTCAS%2fCR%2fS%2fCR.14%40TCAS2&QueryText=within%3cOR%3eview&HighlightType=1

3. As for the 4th amendment, the fact is, that it can only be violated by an actor of the state, IE: Law Enforcement of some sort, including jailers, bailiffs and court authorities.

4. Security guards do have the right to stop and question anyone on any private property they are contracted to do so on as an agent of the owner they are given the same authority over the property as the owner, who has the right to require you submit to a search and identification for the purpose of determining your reason for being on the property, even if you live there. The police call it a (Super Power) that as an Actor of the State (Law Enforcement) do not have the right to do unless they have probable cause.

5. Detention and Arrest are the same thing. Security guards operate under the notion that if they ask you for ID and you refuse they will ask you to leave the property, if you do not or you refuse to leave they can call the police to come determine your purpose and right to be on the property. Since the police have been called to the property, they now have probable cause to detain, arrest and search you if they are so inclined.

My recommendation is if you live or work some place where there are security officers working and you have a reason and purpose for being on the property, just cooperate and tell them who you are and why you are there. Or walk away and leave.

If you are causing a disturbance, assaulting someone, stealing property especially at night, you are a danger to me, yourself or others, anyone can arrest you.

Like I said not picking sides here but if you are going to make such accusatory and opinionated comments you should know what you are talking about an do a bit more research.

All of you who are piling on, the same goes for you. Educate yourself or don't just be aware you might find yourself in a situation where you think you know what you are doing and end up taking that proverbial ride because a security guard arrested you or the police were called and they arrest you for disturbing the peace. And if you have been drinking, be aware Public Intoxication is listed and an offence classified as disturbing the peace.


The writer of the blog has some good points about how some security companies behave, my experience is that DPS is actively perusing and prosecuting companies that are operating outside the law. You can see the stats on that at this link.

http://www.txdps.state.tx.us/psb/quarterly_report_first_2010_2011.pdf

Keep up the watch doging, just be sure to get your info checked out.

Anonymous said...

The appearance is definitely an issue. It needs to be addressed and in fact there was legislation introduced but failed this year that would have made it a bit clearer with respect to vehicles.

There are a couple of things wrong with this blog and I am note taking side, but if you are going to write it, you should be sure of what you are writing. I know a few posts have tried to explain some of this but I will try to consolidate it.

1. The examples you gave of expired employees is bad, all companies listed with DPS have employees listed who are expired and most likely they are not employees anymore so to make the claim is not accurate unless you have information that all those people are still employed with the company. DPS does not remove employees from the list of any complany.

2. A security guard does have arrest authority, just as much as any private citizen does. Here is the code - CHAPTER 14. ARREST WITHOUT WARRANT Art. 14.01. OFFENSE WITHIN VIEW. (a) A peace officer or any other person, may, without a warrant, arrest an offender when the offense is committed in his presence or within his view, if the offense is one classed as a felony or as an offense against the public peace. Here is the link - http://www.statutes.legis.state.tx.us/DocViewer.aspx?K2DocKey=odbc%3a%2f%2fTCAS%2fASUPUBLIC.dbo.vwTCAS%2fCR%2fS%2fCR.14%40TCAS2&QueryText=within%3cOR%3eview&HighlightType=1

3. As for the 4th amendment, the fact is, that it can only be violated by an actor of the state, IE: Law Enforcement of some sort, including jailers, bailiffs and court authorities.

4. Security guards do have the right to stop and question anyone on any private property they are contracted to do so on as an agent of the owner they are given the same authority over the property as the owner, who has the right to require you submit to a search and identification for the purpose of determining your reason for being on the property, even if you live there. The police call it a (Super Power) that as an Actor of the State (Law Enforcement) do not have the right to do unless they have probable cause.

5. Detention and Arrest are the same thing. Security guards operate under the notion that if they ask you for ID and you refuse they will ask you to leave the property, if you do not or you refuse to leave they can call the police to come determine your purpose and right to be on the property. Since the police have been called to the property, they now have probable cause to detain, arrest and search you if they are so inclined.

My recommendation is if you live or work some place where there are security officers working and you have a reason and purpose for being on the property, just cooperate and tell them who you are and why you are there. Or walk away and leave.

If you are causing a disturbance, assaulting someone, stealing property especially at night, you are a danger to me, yourself or others, anyone can arrest you.

Like I said not picking sides here but if you are going to make such accusatory and opinionated comments you should know what you are talking about an do a bit more research.

All of you who are piling on, the same goes for you. Educate yourself or don't just be aware you might find yourself in a situation where you think you know what you are doing and end up taking that proverbial ride because a security guard arrested you or the police were called and they arrest you for disturbing the peace. And if you have been drinking, be aware Public Intoxication is listed and an offence classified as disturbing the peace.


The writer of the blog has some good points about how some security companies behave, my experience is that DPS is actively perusing and prosecuting companies that are operating outside the law. You can see the stats on that at this link.

http://www.txdps.state.tx.us/psb/quarterly_report_first_2010_2011.pdf

Keep up the watch doging, just be sure to get your info checked out.

Anonymous said...

Why do you insist on deleting responses? Do you not want to be "wrong" about certain points you are trying to make?

Anonymous said...

The appearance is definitely an issue. It needs to be addressed and in fact there was legislation introduced but failed this year that would have made it a bit clearer with respect to vehicles.



There are a couple of things wrong with this blog and I am not taking sides, but if you are going to write it, you should be sure of what you are writing. I know a few posts have tried to explain some of this but I will try to consolidate it.



1. The examples you gave of expired employees is bad, all companies listed with DPS have employees listed who are expired and most likely they are not employees anymore so to make the claim is not accurate unless you have information that all those people are still employed with the company. DPS does not remove employees from the list of any complany.



2. A security guard does have arrest authority, just as much as any private citizen does. Here is the code - CHAPTER 14. ARREST WITHOUT WARRANT Art. 14.01. OFFENSE WITHIN VIEW. (a) A peace officer or any other person, may, without a warrant, arrest an offender when the offense is committed in his presence or within his view, if the offense is one classed as a felony or as an offense against the public peace. Here is the link - http://www.statutes.legis.state.tx.us/DocViewer.aspx?K2DocKey=odbc%3a%2f%2fTCAS%2fASUPUBLIC.dbo.vwTCAS%2fCR%2fS%2fCR.14%40TCAS2&QueryText=within%3cOR%3eview&HighlightType=1



3. As for the 4th amendment, the fact is, that it can only be violated by an actor of the state, IE: Law Enforcement of some sort, including jailers, bailiffs and court authorities.



4. Security guards do have the right to stop and question anyone on any private property they are contracted to do so on as an agent of the owner they are given the same authority over the property as the owner, who has the right to require you submit to a search and identification for the purpose of determining your reason for being on the property, even if you live there. The police call it a (Super Power) that as an Actor of the State (Law Enforcement) do not have the right to do unless they have probable cause.



5. Detention and Arrest are the same thing. Security guards operate under the notion that if they ask you for ID and you refuse they will ask you to leave the property, if you do not or you refuse to leave they can call the police to come determine your purpose and right to be on the property. Since the police have been called to the property, they now have probable cause to detain, arrest and search you if they are so inclined.



My recommendation is if you live or work some place where there are security officers working and you have a reason and purpose for being on the property, just cooperate and tell them who you are and why you are there. Or walk away and leave.



If you are causing a disturbance, assaulting someone, stealing property especially at night, you are a danger to me, yourself or others, anyone can arrest you.



Like I said not picking sides here but if you are going to make such accusatory and opinionated comments you should know what you are talking about an do a bit more research.



All of you who are piling on, the same goes for you. Educate yourself or don't just be aware you might find yourself in a situation where you think you know what you are doing and end up taking that proverbial ride because a security guard arrested you or the police were called and they arrest you for disturbing the peace. And if you have been drinking, be aware Public Intoxication is listed and an offence classified as disturbing the peace.





The writer of the blog has some good points about how some security companies behave, my experience is that DPS is actively perusing and prosecuting companies that are operating outside the law. You can see the stats on that at this link.



http://www.txdps.state.tx.us/psb/quarterly_report_first_2010_2011.pdf



Keep up the watch doging, just be sure to get your info checked out.

shawn said...

Yes why are comments being deleted?

Anonymous said...

The appearance is definitely an issue. It needs to be addressed and in fact there was legislation introduced but failed this year that would have made it a bit clearer with respect to vehicles.

There are a couple of things wrong with the responses I have read and I am not taking sides, but if you are going to write it, you should be sure of what you are writing. I know a few posts have tried to explain some of this but I will try to consolidate it.


1. The examples you gave of expired employees is bad, all companies listed with DPS have employees listed who are expired and most likely they are not employees anymore so to make the claim is not accurate unless you have information that all those people are still employed with the company. DPS does not remove employees from the list of any company.


2. A security guard does have arrest authority, just as much as any private citizen does. Here is the code - CHAPTER 14. ARREST WITHOUT WARRANT Art. 14.01. OFFENSE WITHIN VIEW. (a) A peace officer or any other person, may, without a warrant, arrest an offender when the offense is committed in his presence or within his view, if the offense is one classed as a felony or as an offense against the public peace. Here is the link - http://www.statutes.legis.state.tx.us/DocViewer.aspx?K2DocKey=odbc%3a%2f%2fTCAS%2fASUPUBLIC.dbo.vwTCAS%2fCR%2fS%2fCR.14%40TCAS2&QueryText=within%3cOR%3eview&HighlightType=1


3. As for the 4th amendment, the fact is, that it can only be violated by an actor of the state, IE: Law Enforcement of some sort, including jailers, bailiffs and court authorities.


4. Security guards do have the right to stop and question anyone on any private property they are contracted to do so on as an agent of the owner they are given the same authority over the property as the owner, who has the right to require you submit to a search and identification for the purpose of determining your reason for being on the property, even if you live there. The police call it a (Super Power) that as an Actor of the State (Law Enforcement) do not have the right to do unless they have probable cause.


5. Detention and Arrest are the same thing. Security guards operate under the notion that if they ask you for ID and you refuse they will ask you to leave the property, if you do not or you refuse to leave they can call the police to come determine your purpose and right to be on the property. Since the police have been called to the property, they now have probable cause to detain, arrest and search you if they are so inclined.

My recommendation is if you live or work some place where there are security officers working and you have a reason and purpose for being on the property, just cooperate and tell them who you are and why you are there. Or walk away and leave!

If you are causing a disturbance, assaulting someone, stealing property especially at night, you are a danger to me, yourself or others, anyone can arrest you.

Educate yourself you might find yourself in a situation where you think you know what you are doing and end up taking that proverbial "ride" because a security guard arrested you or the police were called and they arrest you for disturbing the peace. And if you have been drinking, be aware Public Intoxication is listed and an offense classified as disturbing the peace.

I appreciate the writer of the blog as he has some good points about how some security companies behave, my experience is that DPS is actively perusing and prosecuting companies that are operating outside the law. You can see the stats on that at this link.

http://www.txdps.state.tx.us/psb/quarterly_report_first_2010_2011.pdf

Anonymous said...

If I were a female I would be scared shatless! This will be a rapist or child molester's dream come true.

Wonder how many of theses "security guards" will be folks who couldn't pass the psychological evaluation for a law enforcement officer?

Anonymous said...

However a rapist or child molester cannot obtain a position as a "Security Guard" without a criminal background check.

And with all seriousness, do you really think you could pass a police psychological exam (MMPI).

A Texas PO said...

Whatever happened to a community's volunteer police force: the citizens on patrol? Why would I, as a city manager, want to pay one of these firms to help patrol my streets when I can recruit members of my community to do it free, without carrying guns or putting themselves in harms way? If people are outraged enough to demand more cops on their streets, then they should be outraged enough to pull themselves away from their tvs and facebook long enough to take a short course at their local PD and walk their neighborhoods.

Anonymous said...

12:47
LOL, failed it sure as hell.

The voices kept talking to me all through the test...

You ever take one?

Gritsforbreakfast said...

Shawn and 11:28, I don't know why you're having trouble with comments, but I didn't delete them. If you've got opinions you think I'd disagree with, try re-posting them.

Anonymous said...

Yes I have taken one. They did not appreciate my sense of humor when asked if I was excited by fire.

Anonymous said...

There have been reports nationwide of shoplifting and other crimes carried out by "flash mobs". These flash mobs are the thing these days-from coast to coast. Don't think private security could handle them.

rodsmith said...

same here anonymous i can remeber back in the 70's when i was in the air force on leave in denver co. there had been a rash of armed robberies and when they finaly caught the idiot he played the i was a poor deprivied individual. got hit with a "man in the street" inteview. Wanted to know what i though about him having a right to steal becasue he was poor. Told the reporter it was fine with me. Just as long as i had the right to blow his brains out if he tried to rob me and gave me any chance at all to take him out!

For some reason that one never went on TV LOL

Hook Em Horns said...

A blogger in Houston did a story about the 40 or so different law enforcement jurisdictions in Harris County alone. Talk about mass confusion. Throw in the wannabe's and you have a recipe for disaster.

Macrobid said...

hi dear ,
funny cars are looks very good.nothing mind belonging for security officer purpose .i like it cars in give a images.

Anonymous said...

Trust me, security guards absolutely CAN search you without probable, or any kind of cause...i have a lovely felony record to prove it!

Have you ever noticed that when you go to a sporting event or a concert that a security guard or an employee of the venue searches you, your purse, your backpack, your cooler, etc and scans you with the hand held metal detector or mans the large doorway type ones while all of the "real" cops are lined up behind them chatting and holding up the walls? Its no accident...its very much intentional and basically a way to circumvent search and seizure laws. Private citizens do not have to have your consent to search you or your belongings nor do they need probable cause...and anything they find and turn over to the police CAN and WILL be used as evidence against you in criminal court.

Anonymous said...

I know that their is alot of Crap talking about security officers on this page and I'm sure some of it is true. I live in a large group of apartment complexes in NE Dallas we have these guys all over the place. My friends and I use to stand out on my balcony and make fun of them as they drove by, when I first moved in. One night at 3am I got a knock on my door. I answered and it was a security officer. They had caught two guys that had broken in to my car and true to remove the radio. They told me that they had called the cops and I would have to talk to the cops since it was my car. Two hours later the real police finally showed up and took the real criminals off to jail. Three months later my girlfriend was coming home after her late night shift at an area restaurant. She pulled up in the parking lot and was approached by a man with a gun. He pointed it at her and demanded her purse and car keys. She was giving it to him when security saw him. He ran. They chased him down on foot and placed him under arrest. Again we waited two hours for the real cops to show. And again they took a real bad guy to jail. These guys saved my car and the love of my life. We are now married and have beautiful children. I don't know about the guys the ppl on this blog are putting down but the security officers in the Village apartments will always have my sincere respect and admiration. Those are real hero in every since of the word! I don't know what they make but its not enough!

Anonymous said...

OK I have been in Law enforcement for 10 years now and this company is nothing compared to TOPGUN Security and with more and more gated committies coming up oyu see more security companys that are looking like a law enforcement but under Texcas state law they have to only make the patch and badge look diffrent no state seal are allowed. Now for tarining the state says they have to have 40 hours ofr training this is not much for level II and III security officer but better then nothing I have conducted this training for some companies and showed the officer what they can cannot do.

Anonymous said...

Its a fact that our country has had private security officers well before any formation of a public police force in fact the united state marshall service the very first federal law enforcement agency was formed with the help of Mr Pickerton the founder of picterton security with the first sworn agents were from the private sector so all of you out there complaining about private security there would be no public police if it was not for the private citizen taking the first step to protect all of us, instead of making fun of there professional appearance we should applaud them for taking pride in there profession, all commission security officers working in Texas are required to take state mandated training therefore these security officers are trained by the state standards in addition alot of security officers are former police officers and former military who are the best trained military force in the world, for those persons complaining I wonder how you would feel if there was no security officers out there protecting life and property, private security officers out number police officers 5-1 nationwide wow how safe would we all be without them, I believe Texas and most states are doing a good job in making sure that security officers are properly trained to protect all of us, so the next time you see a professional security officer out there risking there life to protect a complete stranger, say thank you!
I am a retired police officer and have worked with private security officers through out my 30 years in law enforcement, I have found that the security sector has only improved on training and have become a important member in the law enforcement community, in protecting our citizens, reading this blog is crazy are people actauling complaining because security officers and there security cars look to professional years ago there was no training requirements for security officers anyone could put on a uniform with no training no background check etc, today all security officers go through a very in depth background check and receive state of the art training and are required to be re-trained to keep there commission working as a security officer.

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