Friday, June 19, 2009

TDCJ population still creeping up, but tracking estimates

Here's the total number of people sent to Texas prisons and state jails on felony charges in FY 2008 from the six largest Texas counties and the number of prisoners released back to each of them, according to the Department of Criminal Justice annual statistical report (pdf):

Sent to prison:
  • Harris: 15,276
  • Dallas: 7,405
  • Tarrant: 5,363
  • Bexar: 4,669
  • Travis: 3,143
  • El Paso: 1,164
Released from prison:
  • Harris: 14,654
  • Dallas: 7,564
  • Tarrant: 5,185
  • Bexar: 4,550
  • Travis: 3,084
  • El Paso: 1,147
Overall, Texas sent more people to prison in FY 2008 than it released according to the report: 74,283 people entered TDCJ last year, while 72,002 were released and sent home (out of 156,126 on hand as of Aug. 31, 2008).

TDCJ's population actually maxxed out at 158,217 on May 1, 2008, but by August that number had declined to 156,126. That's about what LBB projected (pdf), to give them credit (they'd estimated 156,137, which is pretty darn close). But the rubber will meet the road this year when LBB predicts that, by the end of FY 2009 (in August), TDCJ's population will have declined to 154,618, so it'll be interesting to see how closely their predictions hold when this year's numbers come out.

6 comments:

Adrienne Dunn said...

Fascinating and a tad depressing. I can hardly wait for the "tough-on-crime" bit of our history to be over. Imagine reading stats like this fifty years from now?

Anonymous said...

Texas is one of the few states in the country that actually believes that they can still do everything.

The recent lack of revenue presented to other states has forced them to ponder their policies instead of just mantaining the status quo.

I do not think that is a bad thing. And the only reason "tough-on-crime" might read differently is that we might not have the money to pay for it.

Or the citizens of Texas might decide that they are throwing good money after bad and want to fund more altruistic social programs.

I'm not holding my breath that either possibility will apply. I find it more likely that what ever befalls Texas as a state they will be ready, willing, and able to blame others for their own misfortunes and continue to incarcerate those around them at record rates, no matter the personal or social costs.

I have chosen a proactive approach to all of this insanity and moved to a reasonable state. I wish all of you well in the great ole state of Texas.

In another fifty years, you are going to need it.

Anonymous said...

Just think how many people would be locked away in prison if all those who NEEDED to be locked up were.

Plato

Gritsforbreakfast said...

How many do you think that would be, Plato? Perhaps half as many as we have now?

Or maybe you want your taxes raised so TDCJ can build and (under)staff a few more units?

Informed Citizen said...

More than half of those who are now a burden on the Texas taxpayers do not need to be.
While those who need to be locked up for their crimes never will be because they are allowed to hide under a position of employment at the expense of the taxpayers.

Boyness said...

Informed Citizen said...

More than half of those who are now a burden on the Texas taxpayers do not need to be.
While those who need to be locked up for their crimes never will be because they are allowed to hide under a position of employment at the expense of the taxpayers.

6/20/2009 08:47:00 AM
-----------------------------
AMEN! Anytime you wanna have some fun or just be depressed, google Texas and Corruption.