Wednesday, March 04, 2009

Whitmire supplies more detail on proposed youth prison diversion money

I just spoke with Sen. John Whitmire, chair of the Senate Criminal Justice Commitee, who thought my post titled "The Yo-Yo Effect" was "off base," particularly my pessimism that there wouldn't be enough money for counties to manage the influx of delinquent kids, or that the Lege might reduce its commitment to such services somewhere down the line.

Whitmire said the main cause of TYC's high costs are a bloated, central office bureaucracy, not just increased staffing ratios in the field. He also gave me names of several county officials who he said were supportive of changes he's proposing, and I promised to speak to each of them and follow up in future blog posts. None of those individuals were immediately available, but in the meantime, one of his staffers forwarded me a proposal from Dallas juvie probation chief Mike Griffith [Correction: I'm now told by reliable sources this plan came from Travis County, not Dallas.] outlining in greater detail than I've heretofore seen the nuts and bolts of how new state funding might functionally supplement counties.

This is easily the most detailed analysis of a possible alternative system I've run across; the section on grants to counties in the Sunset report was decidedly scant. None of this is final, it was emphasized, but Griffith's suggestions are an example of the types of ideas being discussed behind the scenes.

Whitmire's office also forwarded me a proposal from 22 Southeast Texas probation departments estimating they could eliminate more than half their usual TYC commitments if the state gave them just 73% of the current TYC cost-per-inmate.

If these data are any indication, perhaps I've overestimated how much it would cost counties to manage these youth. Particularly readers in juvenile justice fields, take a look for yourself and see what you think.

There will always be a need for some version of youth prisons in Texas, said Whitmire, to house the "worst of the worst," but he thinks there may be "1,200 or so" at TYC right now who could more efficaciously be handled in local communities. Maybe he's right.

I've got other obligations this afternoon, but I'll post more on this topic after I've spoken with a few more people and had a chance to examine the documents sent over from Sen. Whitmire's office in more detail.

46 comments:

Anonymous said...

The problem is that more and more local prosecutors see TYC as the way to handle those "1,200" kids, like when Harris County (and others) admitted that they would certify kids as adults when their authority to refer was reduced.

It may sound good in Austin, but troops on the ground will err on the side of state-level incarceration as opposed to county-level diversion or incarceration.

Anonymous said...

Grits, just read both proposals. Some observations:

1. The Fort Worth one seems more detailed, particularly in its inclusion of specific funding incentives to keep youth in counties rather than TYC. There's also a clearer explanation of funding flows depending on a youth's movement between local and state entities.

2. The SETX one, on the other hand, shows cost savings but seems less clear overall.

3. Both of these proposals, I'd think, present cost savings only if Sen Whitmire is correct that much of TYC's budget is bloated by central administration. Otherwise I wonder if you don't wind up with the same dollar amounts but redirected to counties (which in itself doesn't strike me as a bad thing but seems to run counter to the lege's stated goal of cost savings).

It is noteworthy that Sen Whitmire responded so quickly to your post, not only to explain cost issues but also to rebut the implication that the lege has abandoned all concern with quality programming.

Let's see what happens now.

Bill Bush

Anonymous said...

I should hasten to add that neither pilot proposal is very specific about what type of programming they intend to offer with funds that otherwise would go to TYC.

Bill Bush

Anonymous said...

Some more observations having read the LBB report and the Statesman article.

1. There's a substantial cost-per-youth disparity between TYC and contract facilities b/c the latter receive educational services from local school districts. This goes to Grits' point about needing to do more than just guard. How will county pilot projects provide education?

2. The numbers that Mike Ward gives in his article are really surprising. Over 4K TYC employees and 2.3K youth, while also struggling to meet the 12:1 ratio? Really? If true, this would seem to validate Sen Whitmire's assertion to Grits about administration, also the same Whitmire says in Ward's piece that TYC has "twice as many COs as they need". Which is it?

3. In both the LBB report and these pilot proposals, I'm finding the use of aggregate statistics for cost-per-youth and so forth pretty unhelpful. It really tells us next to nothing about the programming, education, services, etc, kids are getting. How are we supposed to make a cost-benefit analysis if only the "cost" side of the equation is represented?

Disaggregate the stats and tell us something useful.

Bill Bush

Anonymous said...

Also, expenses on the facility level for electricity, water, food, vehicle maintenance, etc., doesn't change with less children. Buildings, vehicles, lawn mowers, water treatment plants still need to be maintained.

Anonymous said...

This may be too much of a tangent, and if so, my apologies in advance. I was just reviewing the currently available recidivism figures for several states; I recommend you do the same. For 2008,Texas shows a rate of 43% for 3 year reincarceration (note: unlike some states, Texas does carry forward for prison and state jail). By comparison, Arizona has a 54% rate for 3 years (figures from 2006). I note AZ in particular because, as we became aware recently, in AZ, an 8 year old can be charged as an adult. While I am not suggesting such charges occur often, it does demonstrate how statistics can "lie." If a child becomes an adult at age 8, he is never in the juvenile system to "recidivate" back to that system (or from that system into the adult system). On to Missouri. Most recent figures are from 2007 and show the apparent impact of small, regional facilities, with a rate of 7.3%. But, that figure only refers to return to juvenile system. Figures for 1999 releases shows a 30% reincarceration in juvenile or adult corrections. No figures have been given for interim years. It is my firmest hope that the Missouri plan works and can be adapted and adopted at other places, including Texas. At the same time, that 7% figure rang a bell. If I recall, the first figures to come out of Georgia's boot camp program showed similar results. It has been my contention that hand picking participants and staff is what made boot camps work... it was the stupid assumption that it would work as well for every delinquent child in the control of any adult staff that failed (as it usually does). Some information is coming out of Missouri that suggests apples may be getting compared to oranges. In Texas, especially if you are not rich (and possibly White, judging solely by the percentages of the population in TYC and in the community), you get sent to TYC if you commit a crime, regardless if you were on drugs, seeking drugs, seeking resources to buy drugs, mentally ill, emotionally disturbed or developmentlly disabled; if you come back to TYC or jail or prison, you recidivate. In MO, you go to treatment and relapse.

Reality check: Eagle Lake was to far from Houston (1hr) to be considered close enough to Whitmire's constituents; but Whitmire continues to try to close WTSS and Victory Field, effectively requiring El Paso/Lubbock/Amarillo families to drive up to 10 hours to see their kids instead of 3. (I will suggest new facilities and traing new staff for these areas will be put on hold in the name of cost cutting.)

Anonymous said...

LOL .... Dallas County is not in support of abolishment of TYC. They passed a resolution against the merging of TYC/TJPC. Read Sunset Public Comments.Guess Dallas County is in support of getting more money (services) and that may be the "support" Whitmire is referring to.

To fix the problems that the State of Texas has overlooked, developed, created, etc. at TYC on the backs of the County Juvenile Boards and Commissioners is ridiculous and wrong.

I have a solution for you. Put plans in place to fix TYC and then stay the course until the job is done.

I have seen nothing proposed at this point but here is my guess:

Create a smaller TYC by limiting the ability of local juvenile judges to commit juveniles to TYC (or whatever it might be renamed)ex: only kids with violent felonies will be eligible for TYC (just like misdemeanors were eliminated).

After this, the state government will promise to provide more money for programs for youth not eligible for TYC anymore. Just like they did last session. BIG NOTE : Grant H funds allocated last session is on the chopping block right now. Grant H funds from TJPC to local juvenile boards were allocated to counties for placement of juvenile offenders who were no longer eligible for TYC. hmmmmm interesting !! If you don't undertand that let me lay it out simpler - they change the law now, give you a little money to say your ok with it and then 2 years, 4 years - they will take the money back.

Since Senator Whitmire seems to speak with Grits so much(??) may I suggest he speak with the juvenile justice professionals within his own District.

Anonymous said...

i think the idea of that the statesman and the legislature use terms like "prisons" and "inmates" and that they compare juvenile delinquents to adult criminals and that they compare the costs of both systems a real problem. bill bush alludes to how these stats were meaningless in his post. we don't really need to mislead ourselves or the public this way. they are different categories i thought. i know, i have to police myself on this issue as well. it is a simplistic comparison. mike ward obviously does not seem to be aware that it is important to understand looking at these two populations separately is important. his paper frequently refers to juvenile corrections officers as "guards" and so did all the persons that perry sent over to tyc about a year ago. you know the pepper spraying first approach guys, some of whom are still around now trying to hold onto their jobs. i think it is sort of interesting that i was told i would be fired on the spot if i looked at this web site. i think it is cool that whitmire is able to look at it without the threat of being fired. obviously i have been looking at it too. i am beginning to think maybe i should just find something else to do with my worklife. working should not be this hard. i have to sign this anonymous or i would probably be fired tomorrow.

Anonymous said...

Grits,

Am I missing something? What exactly is being provided to youth under these proposals? What are performance measures versus TYC's performance measures? Do the local proposals include education or are we just letting the local school district cover that as required by current law? Are we comparing oranges to oranges or is this a comparison between oranges and moldy bread?

Howard A. Hickman

Anonymous said...

I just read both proposals also. I love the concepts BUT are they realistic numbers. Let's face it, my county cut down committments because the legislature forced us to. We cannot cut any more but we sure do need the money to keep sending more to TYC. The SETX plan is very progressive but I would like to see details on how they would keep the kids out of the system.

Anonymous said...

While I commend the writers of these proposals I di not see how the services are current available to divert many more from TYC. Showme the bed space in the privates and I will agree the SETX plan will work. If those numbers are strong then I commend them for taking the initiative. I did not see Harris County listed though.

Anonymous said...

I am reading these as conceptual ideas with no distinct methodology, kinda like the Sunset Recommendation on a new department. I say consolidate THEN look at the further reduction of committments.

Anonymous said...

WOW. Way to go South east. Now, can you do it. Numbers look good on paper but realistically can you do it? It is a very progressive plan.

Anonymous said...

$63,875.00 vs $99,000.00 per year should be a no brainer. If the counties can reach their target reduction I say give them another $10,000 per kid for the effort.
I agree the plan needs more detail but I like the way they are thinking and providing hard facts not just thoughts.

Anonymous said...

This is an excellent idea on the initial read but looking at it in deapth several questions arise:
Why was Harris County not included?
How will the funds be distrubuted?
Looking at TYC website I would be curious to know how they expect to reduce even more the kids sent than they did in 2008 over 2006 (except Jefferson County..what happened there?) Other counties in that list had 3 times the population yet Jefferson County had 3 times the kids sent to TYC. If I was the other counties I would not like it and kick them out.
Did they think about how the economy is and how kids might start doing more crimes just to make it?
It makes too much fiscal sense to work.

Anonymous said...

Am I missing something here? Why is it a region is developing a sound plan to save the state millions of dollars when we pay 2 agency heads and their staff to arrive at these results? This plan was probably thought up and created by a minimum wage financial officer who can look at savings and visualize how it can work. Why did TJPC or TYC directors not put their staff to work on it?
Way to go minimumwagefinancialofficer, we salute you.

Anonymous said...

How about this:

a. Give the counties the diversion money to keep their kids on the local level to place and/or provide services however they choose.

b. Following the receipt of any diversion money, if within 1 year following the receipt of the last payment for that individual child the child is committed to the state, the county returns the diversion money in full.

If the counties are as confident as some seem to be that they have the answers, or can create them if funded, I'm sure they would agree to a money back guarantee. This way we stop all the smoke and mirrors. You take the MONEY....you take RESPONSIBILITY that what you are doing WORKS!!!

Anonymous said...

SouthEastTexas counties, you did a great job thinking outside the box but can you really reduce the number of juveniles going to TYC that drastically? I think you are selling yourself short. Our county has already experienced a influx of felony referrals, of which many will go to TYC just due to the type of crime, no diversion, straight to TYC. We have more on the books not TYC eligible than we have had in 3 years combined. Think long and hard before signing away your life.

Anonymous said...

Ole Whitmire had a closed door meeting with some of the Chiefs after the last Chief's conference where Ms. Spriggs scolded us for blogging on Grits. Sounds like he is starting to listen to the juvenile justice experts, unlike what has happened with the TYC reforms. Look for all of this to roll out soon. Only two or three TYC facilities will remain open for violent and capital offenders.

Anonymous said...

"there may be "1,200 or so" at TYC right now who could more efficaciously be handled in local communities."

Didn't know Whitmire was a judge and knew what was best for my community. Seems he only knows what is cheaper on the State. I want to leave the safety of my community in the Judge's hands. The ones he let out of TYC last time are sure tearing things up!

Anonymous said...

I'm not past that people who have absolutely no experience in juvenile corrections are arrogant enough to allow themselves to be considered experts in the field and believe it. They are willing to play hocus pocus and smoke and mirrors with numbers and information based on erroneus and misleading data. They look upon the public with condescension and disdain, like they are just ignorant and unenlightend fools, especially,certainly if anyone dare express express opinions that differ from theirs. I think they must believe that they are somehow uniquely qualified to solve all social problems and save the world. before anyone continues zi think it is importantto acknowledge that ther e is no way TYC, TP, etc.. can do what it appears they are expected to.In less than a years time it is unrealistic to believe that anyone is going to be rehabilitated. It is unrealistic to believe that it can be done in some years. No agency can undo years of damage. All any of us can do is offer the opportunity aand hope some how some way, they will get it. Meanwhile, we must consider the viictims and public safety. If any of you believe that it is in the youths best interest to allow him to curse, assault, and refuse to to comply with rules, tell him you understand why he beat the old lady , blah blah, than I give up. That is not reality folks. Those kids are just running amokat TYC,and not because they were beaten and abused by staff and are lashing out, nope wrong. They are doing it because they can. Many of you are just naive.

the truth is that nothing needs to be changed. More attention and focus is given to their rights, that those of their victims, o the staff they assault. Please all of you take the time to research,really research what kind of services they were already getting. Howfar do we go? This is just unbelievable.

Anonymous said...

Well I for one am happy SOMEONE is listening to us. How many times has the field tried and tried to get officials, especially TJPC, to understand that probation departments WANT to help kids. But it is an easy fix to just send them to TYC so we don't have to put up with their standards BS and monitors second guessing our every move. If they would think outside the box and learn from the authors of these 2 plans their world would not be in an uproar and the field would support THEM if they supported and listened to US.

Anonymous said...

Who were the chiefs that met with him? Evidently they know their stuff and got him fired up. Must have been the SouthEast Chiefs to come up with the plan.

Anonymous said...

Senator Whitmire knows what he is doing. I just hope it is not ALL about the money. He is showing pizzazz by meeting with the chiefs who actually work in the field. The chiefs that met with him should form a committee and take over TJPC. That way at least there would be true hands on experience at the helm.

Anonymous said...

Bye Bye Victory Field... oh crap my boss just saw me posting this.I'm gone now!

Anonymous said...

Two years after the blow up and TYC is much worse than when it all began! TYC will be little more than a junior prison system for the worst of the worst as Whitmire puts it. All that has been done is to dump all the treatment and education people and keep the guards. Bring back the pepper spray and security / admin-seg to keep the units under control. Just be done with it and stop blowing our tax money. The average tax payer doesn't give a crap about the little gang banger criminals especially at $99,000.00 per year. Let's see $99,000.00 X 1200 = $118,800,000.00 - wow what a chunk of tax payer change for every 1200 youth! I wish my children would had a few years of $99,000.00 spent on them. I raise two good children to productive adults and I have to carry a pack of criminals with my tax money, this is pure bull shit! From what I read most of the youth in TYC don't want to change, what a waste of our tax money! Before you call me a troll know that I am actually a very tired tax payer and nothing else. It just blows my mind that we spend the most on the least deserving who have little chance of turning out for the good. No doubt there are a few select few success out of TYC but I don't read about many. Besides once you have a criminal record you are screwed anyway so why put all the money into these people.

JTP said...

Wow, way to go Mike Ward and Senator Whitmire.

It is just so entertaining to watch the skill at which politics and public media can be woven together.

Last Tuesday, the Texas House followed by the Texas Senate, gave some richly deserved Kudos and brought some much deserved limelight to a story that made Texas look good both nationally and internationally.

That recognition was to Kris Hogan of Grapevine. As you may recall, Kris recognized that all kids respond to being positively recognized. Even kids who are in prison. To that end, he rallied his own sprit group, and parental supporters, along with his football team and showed that a Christian spirit of love and acceptance is not contrary to competitive sports. The story got into ESPN and took off from there, making national news when the Super Bowl included the story at their halftime.

So the Texas Legislature recognized not only Kris Hogan and his spouse, but the TYC coach and his wife, along with TYC Executive Commissioner Cherie Townsend, TYC Director of Residential Services James Smith, Gainesville Superintendent Gwan Hawthorne, TYC Communications Director Jim Hurley, and all the kids from both teams. The story, as told and retold in media around the word, pulled at the heart, and was a testament to the fact that TYC kids respond to LOVE. Imagine that! It’s not as fancy as highly specialized treatment programs, but it’s probably a lot more powerful.

The recognition ceremony gave much deserved recognition to Kris, along with the Grapevine community, and the TYC community.

Coincidently, Mike Ward didn’t write anything that day about the recognition ceremony by both Legislative bodies.

But the next day, by an odd coincidence, Mike Ward wrote a story about the cost of incarcerating a youth in TYC, showing a sensational number of $99,000.

And even more coincidently, Senator Whitmire used Mike Ward’s article to once again say how much fat there was in TYC’s administration and facility staffing, which just showed that more facilities needed to be closed so that only the worst of the worst went to Kiddie Prison. Thank you Mike Ward.

And coincidently enough, on top of that. Senator Whitmire decided to respond to Grits who had blogged in response to Mike Wards piece in the Statesman, .about the Yo-Yo effect created in TYC by the Legislatures’ apparent contradictory directives to TYC administrators.

And even more coincidently, Senator Whitmire just happened to have a few “plans” lying around the office from some Probation Chiefs available that he showed Grits, that demonstrated the viability of his plan for closing some more TYC facilities and “treating” juveniles in their home counties for substantially less than what Mike Ward.

If I didn’t know better, I’d say that was just the most amazing string of coincidences I have seen in a long while. But that would not give credit where credit is due for the skill at which politics and public media can be woven together to create opportunities.

Not only does this new and well timed article by Mike Ward, refocus the Legislature away from the positive recognition the day before that TYC kids received as competitive sportsmen, it dampened the heroic efforts of Townsend, who has cut 25 million by cutting jobs in a lousy economy and eliminating as much waste as she can without destroying any hope of creating a TYC that doesn’t just warehouse the counties throw-away kids.

Thank goodness, that the likes of Rep. Madden and some of his other lawmakers in the Texas Legislature, who are willing to give Townsend a fair shake at remaking the agency.

The argument really isn’t about the numbers or who has a better way to “rehabilitate” the youth who have lost their way. It’s really about competition and whose plan is going to prevail.

If Senator Whitmire is correct in his thinking about the future of TYC, then he will be able to sell his agenda to the rest of the Legislature because he will be able to demonstrate that it really is the best thing for these special Texas kids, and not just because it is his idea.

The Legislators saw that Kris Hogan’s agenda was not to glorify Kris Hogan, but to uplift TYC youths with LOVE, because they are worth it. Thank you Kris. Well Done.

Thank you Grits, for being balanced in presenting the TRUTH.

Thank you Cherie Townsend for not just talking the talk, but walking the walk.

Thank you ESPN. Now the world is watching the State of Texas for signs of more greatness!!

Anonymous said...

I am concerned that these plans are TOO ambitious. They are both well written and the SETX plan has meat and potatos behind it but look at how TYC has ebbed and flowed. 2008 is not a good year yo look at if we are talking about the future of TYC. Most counties followed the lead from legislators and drastically cut in 2008. I have seen before where maybe a down year is followed by a heavy year of commitments. All the counties that cut over 2/3rd's of their commiments will see an upsurge in 2009. The money we got for diversions in 2007 had too many restrictions and did not go far enough. Shear economics will force my county so at least double commitments this year. Also, our types of felony referrals we had at the end of 2008 and thus far are not the youth you want diverted, put on probation services or even in secure placements. Great plans, great concepts and the state applaudes everyone for creating the plans but you need to look at a way of determining TYC commitments based on the number of referrals each county or region has. Our referrals were way down last year but 2009 has started with a bang. I for one will not commit to any further reduction based simply on 2008 data.

Anonymous said...

This plan might sound good in theory but this has been tried before to some extent a few years ago. Many counties had post adjudication facilities to divert youth from going to TYC. They were not very successful. The counties had a hard time getting enough qualified staff and when the youth had behavior problems they were not equipped to handle them and would modify their probation and send them to TYC. It appears to me that their is more of a personal agenda here than what is in the best interest of the citizens and youth of Texas.

Anonymous said...

Lets look at the bigger picture. TYC numbers were drastically deflated in 2008 due to SB 103 and some money being thrown at the county, which is about to go away, and the counties worked hard to keep kids out. The counties spent much more than what was given to them to keep kids diverted. The numbers WILL go up when the money is gone. SETX has a great plan and I too aplaude them for thinking outside the box and wonder how they came up with the idea when state agencies cannot do so.

Anonymous said...

GRITS: Sounds like you should contact the chiefs that met with Whitmire and the Southeast Texas Chiefs that put this plan together. It is a very good concept and I think others should take a hard look at it.

Anonymous said...

How can SETX predict what the future holds. Who's to say their referrals won't increase by double next year? Will they be stuck like Chuck with that target number?
Great ideas but you guys need to look at basing it on future eligible commitments, not past. Keep up the good work and "take over TJPC".

Anonymous said...

Things are fine with how they are as a system.

Fix TYC management, policy issues and problem solved. No reason for anyone to take over anyone elses responsibilities.

Anonymous said...

Whitmire's proposals have nothing to do with making the youth healthier and responsible citizens.

I'm tired of his grand standing and grand canyon ego. Saving money is not a solution to healthier children.

Maybe he should run a facility for a month to see what it is like.

Anonymous said...

Where was the Senator when all of these positions were added at Central Office about 20 months ago? No complaints then.

Anonymous said...

its the public that's gonna suffer, what are these counties gonna do when they've spent their money trying to help these kids, and the kid screws up. no money for placement, no money for TYC, hmmm maybe the kid can hold on till the end of the fiscal year. oh wait two co defendants on a first degree felony what are we gonna do with those?

When the state needs money they will tighten the caps. which will mean less money even if they are successful, Sen. Whitmire, with all respect, is under the impression that probation departments are in control. Police prosecutors, and of course the judge have a hand in where the child ends up.

TYC is getting 2% of the total referrals, and 9% of the felonies. Are there some there that don't need to be sent there, sure, but there also some that should have gone to TYC and didn't (defense attorneys, God love em). That's pretty low, every time the local departments have been given money the numbers have come down. I know the ledge need to do things to show here's what we did, but if we got this far on this why change direction now, its not like there aren't other things to work on.

And why is the focus always on institutions, how about some money to help kids while they are still living at home. Its funny how everyone stopped talking about how poor tyc recidivism rate is, take the 40% you want to cut and spend it on parole and getting these kids transitional services. Intensive probation with an array of services might cost you 100 dollars a week.

I think everyone has lost sight of the big picture, this is supposed to be about helping those that can be helped, nobody learns to live a productive life inside the walls of an institutions. Not TYC, not TDCJ, not drug rehab, not a mental hospital, and not even county run institutions. The only reason that the counties are better at this is the probation component, and its ability to provide services in the home to children and their families. There are absolutely children in this state who are scary, but they were created (mostly) by scary families. If this part of a child's life is not fixed or removed, he will at some point end up in an institution somewhere. Lets get some money to keep kids out of institutions period, and protect the people who are paying for all this anyway.

Anonymous said...

I think these plans are TOO ambitious. You really need to look at how many felony referrals there were in 2008 and base your estimate on that number. To just go out there and say "SEE WHAT WE CAN CUT" is crazy. The plans look good in theory but once again, looking at cost savings over helping the kids is not always a good thing. There are many kids that NEED to go to TYC.

Anonymous said...

SOMEONE PLEASE COME UP WITH SOMETHING BETTER!! I just looked at the plans and tried to apply them to my county and I cannot live with the reduction. We too have had a hugh increase in referrals in the past 5 months and have identified almost double the amount of kids we will send to TYC in the first half of the year. My committments will reach all of last year's within the next 45 days if the proceedings go as scheduled.

Anonymous said...

I think the regional concepr is a great idea for small counties who only send 1-5 per year but get to the medium on up they need more flexibility. Dallas area counties are growing fast. Houston area counties even faster. With population growt come referral growth. Someone needs to examine those issues and work out a plan.

Anonymous said...

Basic line is..legislatures don't care about the kids. They are expendable and are only dollar signs. These same children who need guideance, health care, school and 3 square meals to get a healthy body and healthy mind are in the legis' mind as INMATES...not CHILDREN. Throwing away the children is what the budget cut is doing. There will be mass exidus and who is hurt, the kids. Ratio will go to pot and everyone will be at risk.

Anonymous said...

18 years ago when I came to work at TYC, Central Office staff was a fraction of what it is now. The whole kit and kaboodle fit comfortably in a section of the Brown-Heatly building. Then, under Steve Robinson, TYC grew, but Central Office grew even more. Then, we had the Pope era. Wow! Central Office became a welfare agency for her cronies. The HR dept grew huge, and became far less responsive than it has ever been. Progress. Where was the good Mr. Whitmire when all that was going on? He kept praising Ms Pope for the wonderful job she was doing.

Anonymous said...

8:30 pm, you are so correct! Now they have two buildings to house them.

Wouldn't it stand to reason that the reduction in population and field employees would also give them less work? Many field staff have been demoted, need I day more. What about all those regional people? What do they do besides retaliate and tell central office what they want to hear? One of them appeared on our dorm and could not answer our questions and would only say, "I have been sworn to secrecy & can't discuss the details." Why not", we asked? There was dead silence!

Anonymous said...

With so much wastful spending and Austin TYC has grown, friends of friends are placed in special jobs and the budgetis busting, as the field is steadily cut to the bone. Why does this continue under Cherie's elites of Austin?

Anonymous said...

I like the plans and think with a bit of work they can be very effective. Let's get all the regions on board. I do think the SETX plan may be short on their target rate but that is an easy fix.

Anonymous said...

3:08 pm, what kind of brownies have you been eating?

Anonymous said...

Brownies? This dude is smoking pot, and see things in a strange way. The dazed vision makes him fit his position like most state staff do.