Saturday, August 23, 2014

Death by cop

Grits avoids much discussion of hot-button topics from other states like the Ferguson riots because there are enough problems with the justice system here in Texas to keep me more than occupied. But a related story from The Economist included this graphic contrasting the remarkable volume of deaths from police shootings in the United States to other countries:


So in Japan or Britain, getting shot by police may get the deceased on a list like this one, while in America on average it happens more than once a day. Wow.

12 comments:

Anonymous said...

What surprises me more is Grits lack of comment on the Perry indictment. With integrity funding, a drunken district attorney and our beloved Governor, there is plenty of fodder. I'm glad it hit the national news and even the BBC. I can't help think there is more to this story, but clearly Texas has serious issues with politics, criminal justice and good 'ol boys.

Gritsforbreakfast said...

I've commented on the drunken DA before, but Perry's episode hasn't really struck a chord with me. Don't really care, don't think it matters, focused on other things. Besides, it's getting plenty of coverage.

Since we're going off topic, I'm more agitated over Wendy Davis' asinine proposal to eliminate the statute of limitations for rape, but haven't had time to comment on that, either. Just idiotic. She's listening to bad advice.

Elvis said...

Can you also compare and post the LEO line of duty deaths among these countries?

doran said...

Here is a link to an article which puts the number of Americans killed by American police at in excess of 5,000.

https://www.dojmedia.com/u-s-police-have-killed-over-5000-civilians-since-911/.

And here is a link to an article by Paul Craig Roberts on this subject: http://www.lewrockwell.com/2014/08/paul-craig-roberts/5000-americans-killed-by-cops-since-911/

Elvis, I'm fairly sure that if you come up with that data you asked about, Grits will let you post it in a comment. You might also be interested in finding out which profession is considered the most dangerous: Law enforcement officer, farmer, or fire fighter.

Anonymous said...

Michael Pimental, the Chief of Police in Elmendorf near San Antonio, was shot and killed while attempting to serve an arrest warrant today. I wonder if Eric Holder will come help out with the investigation?

Paul-UK said...

Elvis, here you are

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_British_police_officers_killed_in_the_line_of_duty

John N Florida said...

Anonymous; it's doubtful unless the Rangers sudden;y identify and coerce confessions out of 5 black kids who 'claimed' they were fishing at the time.
White victims in Texas stand a decent chance of being revenged by LE - whether they get the RIGHT black person convicted or not.

Blue_in_Guadalupe said...

Grits, please explain how removing the statute of limitations on rape is a bad idea. I'm not nearly as familiar with the judicial system and law enforcement as you and many of the commenters here. To my uninitiated mind it would seem a good thing that when a DNA match either from a previously untested rape kit or other DNA evidence is finally made the crime could then be prosecuted.

paul-uk said...

May I add another comment here, the figures for death at the actions of law enforcement officers published by the FBI only include those deaths deemed justifiable by law-enforcement, they do not include accidental deaths

Anonymous said...

Doran, the number in your link is spread out over a number of years, the average coming close to what was reported by Grits.

Anonymous said...

It's been proven throughout time that the catalyst for increasing violence against LE is directly related the the increased offensive measures and tactics implemented by LE. At the rate we're going, SWAT teams will be the norm when responding to get granny's cat out of the tree. Some of these agencies could use a little self reflection at the image they portray isn't much more that a sloppy, wrinkled pair of pajamas with a lot of tactical gear wrapped around in a fashion they aren't even trained to employ. Warriors go to war, peace officers go make peace to the extent they can. At the current rate we'll have Storm Troopers roaming the streets demanding one's pedestrian license as futuristic norm.

Gritsforbreakfast said...

@Blue in Guadalupe, consider: what is the purpose of the statute of limitations? It's a due process protection, to keep you from having to defend against events that occurred so long ago that the distance in time impedes evidence gathering. Scott Greenfield made the case against it here; I linked to his post in the text rather than repeat what he wrote, but endorse his criticism of Davis' proposal.

Also, to be clear, if there's a DNA match, there's already no statute of limitations in Texas. But if there isn't, should an accusation without DNA corroboration from, say, 15 years ago be enough to prosecute? That's the issue.