Tuesday, August 23, 2011

Dallas PD hosts conference on social media

In September the Dallas Police Department is hosting a conference titled "Social Media In Law Enforcement" (SMILE). Here's a topline description:
Adoption of social media by law enforcement is in a stage of exponential growth. Some law enforcement agencies have already experienced tremendous successes; while others are ready but don’t know how to get started. The law enforcement field is ready to add another weapon to its arsenal. The Social Media the Internet and Law Enforcement (SMILE) conference will arm you with all the technical hands-on skills and the practical knowledge to enter the social media world with confidence.

The SMILE Conference is the leading conference devoted to Social Media, the Internet and Law Enforcement initiatives. The SMILE Conference has pioneered the adoption of social media by law enforcement agencies across the world for public outreach, crime prevention, and forensics. In conjunction with the ConnectedCOPS™ blog, The SMILE Conference has become both the go-to and most trusted source by law enforcement agencies worldwide.

–> A SPECIAL EMPHASIS ON PUBLIC ORDER, SOCIAL ACTIVISM, AND THE CHANGING RELATIONSHIP WITH TRADITIONAL MEDIA

The first day of the conference, attendees hear from law enforcement and communication professionals on topics of social media strategy, reputation management, policy and other issues pertaining to community outreach. This (the fourth) SMILE Conference will also emphasize the changing role between law enforcement, social activists and traditional media. Thursday will offer an entire day of topics covering social activists’ interference with investigations, maintaining public order, and mass surveillance in an open source world.
At $499 for pre-registration, it's a bit on the pricey side, but it'd sure be interesting to hear more about law enforcement and social media, both as a outbound communications strategy and their efforts to conduct "mass surveillance in an open source world."

11 comments:

Paul UK said...

Sorry, I have some very grave misgivings about this. Why now? Is it due to the events in London? For some reason when social media gets used for protest in Egypt or Libya, it is fine. When used in London or San Fransisco then it is a sign of breakdown of society which must be ruthless policed. I prefer to take a page out of Norway's book. After the tragedy there, the Prime Minister said we have to respond with more democracy.

Anonymous said...

06:08 "When used in London or San Fransisco then it is a sign of breakdown of society..."
Are you defending this flash mob anarchy?

Texas Maverick said...

Paul UK, how true. I think back to Chicago in 1968. Instead of entering into dialogue with protesters the response was elect Nixon on a "Law & Order" platform and the resulting "War on Drugs" failure. When people rebel against current norms, Norway's approach might have positive results. We haven't tried it, so why not give it a chance. What we're doing with the "tough on crime" hasn't worked very well, but the small changes since 2007 TX Lege.may have made a dent. Fear of something new or unknown doesn't work. trying to infiltrate to spy is the wrong approach. We will adjust to the new. Social media is here to stay and will/has changed our society. How we respond is the question.

Gritsforbreakfast said...

No, 1:57, Paul is pointing out the irony that when the same tactics were used in the Arab Spring in Tunisia, Egypt, etc., westerners thought it was the greatest thing since sliced bread. He's identifying hypocrisy, not advocating violence.

One needn't justify flash mob violence, etc., to say that government shouldn't overreact to it with "mass surveillance." Crimes are still committed by individuals, not by the "masses," and investigations should still require probable cause.

Anonymous said...

I agree with you Grit's about the Abrab Spring anology. I see 1984 written all over this. Communist East Germany neighbors telling on neighbors. What our law enforcement wants is a bunch of tattle tails. I do not condone the flash mobs they are cowardly in my opinion; however, we are not a free couintry anymore when you look at the tough on crime approach, drug war and the patriot act. Who knows with the world water and food shortage about to come home to roost here also who knows what we will experience next. The law enforcement is only doing this to help themselves and all it takes is some one mad at some one else to go and tattle. More ways to lock people up in the Texas Ovens to die.

Anonymous said...

"When the same tactics were used in the Arab Spring in Tunisia, Egypt, etc., westerners thought it was the greatest thing since sliced bread. He's identifying hypocrisy..."

When 30-40 thugs run into a jewelry store and rob it, I guess we should think of this as be equivalent to the Arab Spring? How could anyone possibly compare these two events or see any hypocrisy?

Gritsforbreakfast said...

11:08, do you believe that's all that was going on in London, for example, where riots began over a police shooting? They also want to limit social media. Certainly some criminals took advantage of the situation, but there were underlying political causes that generated the flashpoint.

For that matter, do you somehow think there was no opportunistic crime in Tunisia or Egypt? That they didn't involve riots, destruction of private property, looting and other open defiance of governmental authority? Of course they did! That aspect was just overlooked or minimized in the western media because the rioters were being romanticized.

Finally, whether they're comparable or not, that doesn't change my argument that "Crimes are still committed by individuals, not by the 'masses,' and investigations should still require probable cause."

Anonymous said...

Amen!! Grit's!!!

DEWEY said...

"The law enforcement field is ready to add another weapon to its arsenal."
So they are thinking the pen is mightier than the sword??

Scott Dickson said...

Most law enforcement agencies are using social media to get their message out and not so much for "spying". There is a proliferation of law enforcement Twitter accounts and Facebook pages that lends credence to that argument. Social media is one way for law enforcement to connect with the communities they serve.

However, if you commit a crime and then brag about it on Facebook, don't be surprised if it gets noticed.

I'll be at that conference next month. I bet that most of it will be on how to use social media to connect with your community and not for the more ominous reasons that other commenters have posted on. We see how well it went for BART Police when they tried the dark side of technology.

Anonymous said...

I agree Scott but watch for the ole hidden agenda.