Tuesday, June 03, 2008

Around the blogs

I was flattered to find Grits included in this compendium of the top 100 criminal justice blogs (in the view of the Criminal Justice Degrees Guide). The list includes a fine assortment of criminal justice blogs written from a variety of viewpoints, a number of which were new to me. Check it out and update your blogrolls accordingly.

Meanwhile, Jeff Rambin has established a new blog focusing exclusively on Tyler's 12th Court of Appeals, titled appropriately enough, Tyler Appeals. See, for example, this discussion of a case in which the court ruled that even though prosecutors urge jurors to draw conclusion about guilt from the failure of a defendant to testify, prosecutors can make that argument regarding the failure to produce documentary evidence. The Tyler court ruled that the right against self-incrimination is only implicated by reference to the defendant's own testimony, not the production of documents in the defendant's possession. That's splitting the hair mighty thin, don't you think?

11 comments:

Ted Clayton said...

Congratulations - That is quite an honor!

And thanks for the list of most-recognized legal blogs.

In fact, I have 'passed' on following or getting involved with on-line legal resources, for years. There are so many fascinating subjects to investigate.

But the way Texas went after the FLDS scared me. This is dangerous, and citizens need to sit up, pay attention, and challenge deviant government behavior. Otherwise, the value of being a citizen will erode.

There is a limit to the number of blogs I can keep tabs on. The FLDS affair has taken most of my free time lately, and this level of focus is not sustainable.

I have to work for a living. I like to hike into the mountains for days.

Still, civic affairs are too important to neglect, just because the Internet makes it possible to pursue such a wide range of personal interests.

Thank you, Scott!

Acerbic said...

Congratulations, dood :)

This was the blog I woulda and shoulda done 12 years ago after getting railroaded by Susan Reed and her posse down in Bexar County.

Admittedly, I took the easy way out and exited the state once those scumbags decided they had enough fun with me to release me from custody.

In the years since I have sampled life and politics in a number of other states and have come to the belief that, all-in-all, Texas has good laws on the books.

The problem lies in the way they are executed (or not) and misapplication of justice for those who can't afford effective representation.

As the FLDS case shows (which is how I found your blog) Texas and its various LEOs will lie and cheat and violate every damned constitional right we hold so dear in the furtherance of the agenda of the monied class, regardless of political stripe.

I won't hold out the hope it will ever change, but I will give kudos to people like you who put the truth in the public spotlight.

God bless you, dood :)

kbp said...

My hat is off to you, sir!

"...how media and the justice system collide"

TxBluesMan said...

Good job Scott

rage said...

Hey look, txblues took the opportunity to congratulate you without pomoting himself.

Might big of him.

And that's not hair splitting, my guess is that it would be overturned by the feds if ever appealed. Assuming, of course, it was a substantive part of the case and not "harmless..."

Anonymous said...

Congrats to you and all the intelligence shown by the people who post here, especially me. (lol)
We do need more moderate and realistic participation to offset the extremists of the left.

Plato

TxBluesMan said...

LOL @ rage.

Grits knows that I respect the work he does, even if he is wrong on most of the issues...

mom2oneson said...

WTG!!!!!

Acerbic said...

I don't begrudge tx for his views. He gets on other people's blogs and attacks them but when they reciprocate on his blog he deletes their comments.

As long as he's having fun discussing issues with himself (like masturbation) I ain't gonna fault him.

rage said...

He deletes comments? What a baby.

I wouldn't know, I get enough of his ignorance here without having to get it full force on whatever blog he thinks he's got.

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