Friday, April 06, 2007

It's Good Friday - A time to reflect on snitching

Today is Good Friday, the day after Judas betrayed Jesus to the Roman authorities, launching the chain of events that led to Christ's crucifixion and ultimately His Easter resurrection. Judas was a paid Roman informant according to canonical biblical texts. Like the principal snitch portrayed in the book and movie Rush, set in my hometown of Tyler, tradition says Judas committed suicide following his betrayal.

Other non-canonical "gospels," however, portray Judas as Christ's double agent, a provocateur luring the Romans to arrest Jesus in the Garden of Gethsemene as part of the Lord's grander plan. Whichever depiction is more accurate (and we cannot know), that's why for me on Good Friday my thoughts always turn to the subject of informants, their motives, and how longstanding and profoundly human are the conflicts that arise from the practice - this morning is no exception.

Of the nearly 2,000 posts on Grits, one I'm proudest of was an item on the role of snitching in the Passion story published on Good Friday of last year. Another of my all-time favorites examined the values behind snitching and society's love-hate relationship with informants, also in terms of religious and traditionally conservative values. With little hope today of coming up with something as inspired, I thought I'd just link to these items for those who didn't read them a year ago. Check them both out, if you're interested, and see other prior Grits posts on informant use and abuse.

8 comments:

Provident 360 said...

Grace and peace be multiplied unto you through the knowledge of God, and of Jesus our Lord, which according to his abundant mercy hath begotten us again unto a lively hope by the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead. - Good Friday

sunray's wench said...

A time to reflect also on stealing and distorting evidence: Easter is always on the first Sunday after the first full moon following the Spring Equinox. Why? Because the Christians wanted to convert the pagans to Christianity and decided to put their 'holy' days close to the existing pagan ones to make the transition more palitable. Its not an Easter Bunny, it's a Hare.

Anonymous said...

How about reflecting on the death penalty imposed on an innocent person?!

CelticTexan said...

How about reflecting on the death penalty not being imposed on a guilty murderer?! A much more likely scenario

Anonymous said...

THAT's what CelticTexan takes from the Easter story! Nice!

Now Barabus, not Christ, is who Christians should focus their concerns upon at Eastertime. Wow - that's revisionism!

CelticTexan said...

Well then again you could reflect on the Texas legislative process "conveniently" being opened with Islamic prayer. Now that is how to celebrate Easter.

Anonymous said...

Yes, CelticTexan, let's reflect on how Jesus loved that Muslim Imam so much he died for the man's sins, and also how Jesus told his followers "let he among you who is without sin cast the first stone."

CelticTexan said...

Oh no doubt about it. Jesus definitely intended for Islam to be saved by his death on the cross.

All muslims know their 72 virgins will come straight from the kindness of Christ.

http://www.ivorydome.us/2007/01/29/breaking-news/#comments

Hey you got to admit the above is funny.