Tuesday, October 31, 2006

Scare tactics not just for kids on Halloween

Over at Pandagon, Amanda's experience every Halloween growing up in Alpine, Tx, sounds similar to mine in Tyler - a lot of religious folks wanted the event banned entirely for its allegedly Satanic origins, and the whole thing every year became a ridiculously overblown controversy.

Back in my day, the big scare threat was razor blades in apples, though that never really occurred in the real world. Now it's scare rhetoric about sex offenders.

It's all pretty silly since nearly all child molestation happens in the home and with people who know the victim, not some stranger doling out Tootsie rolls.

Why all the scare rhetoric? I'd guess a trick or treater is much more likely to be hit by a car than to be molested - I could find no examples of that happening via a Google search, and I've simply never heard of it.

Just let the kids go get some candy and have some fun, for heavens sake, and if you're worried what will happen, tag along. It's called "parenting."

10 comments:

Anonymous said...

"Why all the scare tactics?"

Sheriffs have to run for re-election, too.

Anonymous said...

Strangers who abduct children are more likely to kill the victim than a family member or aquaintance.

Anonymous said...

"Strangers who abduct children are more likely to kill the victim than a family member or aquaintance."

So why dont we have a regestry for those convicted of any violence agains t persons or murder??

Gritsforbreakfast said...

"Strangers who abduct children are more likely to kill the victim than a family member or aquaintance."

But is there any evidence that this has been a problem at Halloween? In all the news coverage on the topic, have you seen ONE anecdote of a child being molested or kidnapped while trick or treating? I couldn't find any. I've seen nothing that indicates it's a problem - it's surely not as big a threat as walking around the streets at dusk when they might be hit by a car. That's easily the bigger risk of death, if that's your concern.

Powerslave105 said...

Halloween is just a convenient time for the pro-registry folks to scare the bejesus out of us and raise awareness for the cause. "Strangers who abduct" makes a good point, but victims of already registered sex offenders were not helped by the information. The registry does give the cops somewhere to fish when something bad happens, ala round up the usual suspects, but by then the damage is done. I guess the big question is, "Does the registry prevent sexual assaults or abductions?" Who knows, but my gut says no.

800 pound gorilla said...

You've heard the truism: "there's safety in numbers". Those who do evil shun the light because they don't want others to know what evil they do [John 3:20]. This scripture doesn't just explain why drug warriors won't debate. It's too risky to try abduction with so many potential witnesses. Getting caught is a big concern for the criminally oriented.

Anonymous said...

There was a Halloween abduction in Wisconsin. In 1973. I don't recall the killer having a previous record, though, so even if all today's restrictions were in place, none would have applied to him.

Anonymous said...

Just because you can't find one article or some statistics about children being molested or kidnapped during Holloween doesn't mean the public shouldn't take extra precaution. If I knew that a convicted sex offender lived in my neighborhood, I would want to know it, and I wouldn't want him to participate in holloween. It sounds like you all are appeasers to the sex offenders.

Gritsforbreakfast said...

"appeasers to the sex offenders."

If a problem has never presented itself, it harms public safety to expend resources to resolve it at the expense of more important concerns. With kids in the street all night, for example, there's a good chance you'd do more to protect them if cops doing this were on traffic enforcement. Certainly 911 responses already escalate with drunks and partyers out on Halloween, so checking on sex offenders takes manpower from responding to them. What you see as "appeasement" to me is just a resistance to fear-hyped grandstanding that would shift resources from their optimal public safety use as a PR stunt. It's like you think sex offenders are Germany, but in this case France has not been invaded.

chunxue said...

During the World War II, Art Deco jewellery was ugg sale a very popular style among women. The females started ugg boots wearing short dresses and cut their hair short. And uggs such boyish style was accessorized with Art Deco jewellery. They used cheap ugg boots long dangling earrings and necklaces, multiple bracelets and bold ugg boots uk rings.Art Deco jewellery has harshly geometric and symmetrical theme instead disocunt ugg boots of free flowing curves and naturalistic motifs. Art Deco Jewelry buy ugg boots today displays designs that consist of arcs, circles, rectangles, squares, and ugg outlet triangles. Bracelets, earrings, necklaces and rings are added with long ugg boots outlet lines and curves.One example of Art Deco jewelry is the Art Deco ring. Art Deco rings have ugg mall sophisticated sparkle and bold styles. These rings are not intended for a subtle look, they are meant to be noticed. Hence, these are perfect for people with bold styles.